Silvio Bondage

The 322nd episode of our 12 Questions segment features producer Silvio Bondage.

Silvio Bondage

1. How old are you, where are you living and how long have you been producing and Djing?

I’m 38 years old and live in Vigevano, near Milan. I began djing in clubs in 2000, starting my path as a producer in 2010

2. Where do your musical roots lie, what are your first memories of electronic music and when did you know you wanted to pursue it seriously? Are there any particular productions or artists from the past that really made you think to yourself ‘this is what I want to do.”

None of my family members is passionate about music, I started listening to music on my own and doing research as a kid. At the age of 17 I was inspired: music was always present in my life, it filled me, emptied me and then filled me up again with feelings, that’s when I understood I had to start playing. I can’t mention a particular production, but many artists had an impact and put down roots in my perception of music: Bjork, , Trentemoller, Moby, Royksopp, Apparat, The Knife, Aphex Twin, Kruder & Dorfmeister, Emiliana Torrini

3. How difficult was learning to produce for you in the beginning? Did you take any Audio Engineering programs or production courses to help you out or are you pretty much self taught? And did anyone give any advice early on that really helped?

At the beginning it was quite difficult, I didn’t study Audio engineering, neither as a musician nor as a producer, I am completely self-taught. I started using Ableton, which I still use. I followed a few tutorials and continued studying and doing research, and of course I asked some of my colleagues for advice.

4. What parts of the production process do you find the most difficult and what comes easiest for you? When you do hit a creative block what helps you through it?

The hardest part is definitely the finalization and burning, while the easiest is researching the  sound I’m aiming for and letting my imagination loose in building the piece. Creative blocks happen often, and when they do I need to unplug changing completely what I am doing, talking a walk in nature, to then start over feeling regenerated.

5. What’s a normal day like for you? Do you have a job outside of electronic music? And what do you like to do when you’re not working on music?

Yes, I have a job outside music, I’m a sales manager and work in the fashion industry. A normal day for me is dedicating myself to my first job, do some physical activity and then dedicate the rest of my day to music.
When I am not working on my music I like to cook, run and drink good wine.

6. Apart from electronic music what other genres do you listen to and who are your favourite artists outside of electronic? and do these genres or artists have a direct effect on your own productions?

I like different kinds of music, and listen to various genres: hip hop, pop, melodic rock, traditional Indian and classical. I don’t think these influence me much, but trip hop, ambient and electronic in general do.

7. What was the first and last physical (CD, Vinyl, Cassette etc)  piece of music you bought?

The first cd album I bought was Erotica by Madonna, the last one the Inevitable End by Royksopp

8. Tell us something about yourself that might surprise people?

I hate soccer hahah

9. Which producers in your opinion get consistently overlooked?

I think artists like Davi, Lehar, Athea have a lot of talent and deserve higher levels, but also the new production scene coming to light, Italian as well. Unfortunately there isn’t enough room in the industry and some talents can go unnoticed.

10. Which producers consistently inspire you? And where else does your inspiration come from?

Among many inspiring artists, Royksopp and Trentemoller are definetly the ones that have a stronger impact on me. Cold, distant sounds, dark but also deep, strong and vibrant. Natural elements are also very inspiring for me.

11. There are countless producers out there trying to find their way and create their own unique sound, what advice do you have for them?

Listen to music, but  never copy others, be receptive and sensitive with your soul to let out the real nature of your music. Don’t worry about being judged. Be very critical About yourself, and always ask yourself if you would buy and dance the music you produced.

12. If the final DJ/live set of your career was next week what would your last track be?

Definitely a memorable trip, Time Pachanga boys. I get the goose bumps every time I listen to it again, a real masterpiece.

‘Gute Fahrt’ is out now on Clinique Recordings, you can purchase the release: here

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  • Mitch Alexander
    Mitch Alexander

    WRITER @ C-U

    Mitch Alexander is the owner of microCastle | Beatport "One of the most influential, tastemaker labels out there and also part of our genre committee."