Saytek

Saytek: Whilst some parts of the world are moving towards celebrating diversity and equality, there are many who still reject ‘Political Correctness’, seeing it as a threat to their often bigoted viewpoint of the world and freedom of speech. These people are anti-anyone telling them what is morally right or how not to offend others. So often these people regard themselves as a persecuted minority in society…

Saytek: I love watching live streams and try to watch as many artists performing as possible. Yet often when female DJs are performing its hard ignore things like “they’re shit” or “they should be using vinyl” popping up in the comments section. Or when they’re using vinyl, it’s usually “they can’t mix”. Then there are those that make wild and inappropriate assertions on how they got into their position. Or men who say they only made it because of their looks. Whilst others go on to blatantly sexualise them instead.

Saytek: 99% of the time I find these comments coming from middle-aged blokes. Maybe it’s because there weren’t as many female DJs back in early days of dance music, that these often bitter people think women are given an unfair advantage nowadays? Or perhaps these people just have it embedded into their consciousness that it’s okay to abuse women? Its fair to say that male DJs get negative comments as well but from my experience, it’s the females that get a disproportionate amount of negativity and can often result in what seems like a pack mentality of a group of men ganging up against women with comments increasing in venom as they egg each other on.

Saytek: Those with these deep-seated views are not willing to look at their own behaviour, so they’re never likely to change. Yet given that culture has begun to change so fast, these people are now starting to fall into the minority out there. So maybe it’s time they finally began to realise they’ve got the majority against them?

This of course is just the tip of the iceberg and illustrates a much larger problem in the scene (and society at large) with sexism and men acting inappropriately towards women being highlighted more than ever in clubland by both clubbers and professionals.

Saytek: I think it’s time we showed zero tolerance for misogyny. We can’t change people but we can change what goes on in our scene. When someone is posting sexist stuff online or in live streams we need to start calling these people out and saying “this isn’t acceptable”.

It’s so important to take a stand because this behaviour is so far removed from what our scene is supposed to be about! That’s why we need to start taking control of our threads and warning these people. And if their behaviour becomes abusive or starts to look like bullying start banning them from our pages, online communities, and calling these people out on other threads if we find them doing it elsewhere too.

Saytek: People may say this is censorship but we are perfectly within our rights to decide what view points are expressed on our artist/business pages

At the end of the day, it’s not rocket science. It’s about having basic human decency. It’s about having respect for others and it’s about creating a better world.

Saytek Live Jams Vol. 2′ will be released on November 3rd 2017 on Detone

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  • Mark Betteridge

    Mark Betteridge is C-U's owner and founder. C-U was formed to support up and coming artists in the underground and promote genres that were being ignored by the dance music media.