Jaksa Pavicevic

With Jaksa Pavicevic having new music out this week on A Must Have we catch up with him for the latest episode of 12 Questions.

Jaksa Pavicevic

1.How old are you, where are you living and how long have you been producing and Djing?

Im 37, living in Dubrovnik, Croatia, one of the most beautiful places on planet, according to many. I’ve been producing for good 17 years now. Still learning, still having the sparkle I had on day one.

2. Where do your musical roots lie, what are your first memories of electronic music and when did you know you wanted to pursue it seriously? Are there any particular productions or artists from the past that really made you think to yourself ‘this is what I want to do.”

I was maybe 13 when mother bought me Use Your Illusion album by G’n’R. I remember it was sort of the emotion I never felt before. But you might call it puberty also. But I actually knew I want to be a musician even before, I just didn’t know that Id end up in techno. Looking at the music nowadays it could get worse. A lot.

3. How difficult was learning to produce for you in the beginning? Did you take any Audio Engineering programs or production courses to help you out or are you pretty much self taught? And did anyone give any advice early on that really helped?

It wasn’t. I didn’t knew much, sound wise. I didn’t know a thing.I just loved to mix stuff, mix melodies, putting them together to sound like they meant to be together. It made me feel good and I never think Id go this far. To spend my whole youth still loving it. I didn’t take any classes or courses, I just spoke to a loads of people. Exchanging emails with Chris Cowie who released with Intec back then was like the biggest thing for me. Then there was Croatian guy, Ivan Komlinovic who gave me loads of advices. I also read a lot stuff, printed million of articles from the internet etc etc.

4. What parts of the production process do you find the most difficult and what comes easiest for you? When you do hit a creative block what helps you through it?

Bad mixdown, wrong sound placement, for example, bad mastering. I really want to make sure that my track will sound equally good in a car, on a hi-fi and in the club.

On the flip side, easiest and maybe the best thing is when I have the first idea, then its great to keep building on it.

When I hit the wall of ‘No Ideas’ I just keep pressing hundreds of keys for days hoping I will get something revolutionary good. I really hate to sound the same from one song to another. Its like repeating what I already did. I don’t like repeating in any form.

5. What’s a normal day like for you? Do you have a job outside of electronic music? And what do you like to do when you’re not working on music?

Its just rush from the moment I wake up till I go to sleep. My daily job is quite dynamic since I work in logistics department of tourist agency, but I learned to live with it. The rest of the time is reserved for my young family and my friends. Im also really happy if there is a beer in a fridge or football game on a TV.

6. Apart from electronic music what other genres do you listen to and who are your favourite artists outside of electronic? and do these genres or artists have a direct effect on your own productions?

I love post rock, Sigur Ros and Lights Out Asia. I tried to use some distortions Sigur Ros uses. Never came any near.

7. What was the first and last physical (CD, Vinyl, Cassette etc) piece of music you bought?

First vinyl was Adam X – On the Dex EP back in 1997 and the last was Orange E.P by Ante Perry. Been looking for it for so long. I finally have it.

8. Tell us something about yourself that might surprise people?

I’d love to be Roberto Benigni in my next life

9. Which producers in your opinion get consistently overlooked?

Kanye West!! Im kidding of course. Taho, Julles Wellls, Kurt Baggaley… I think these guys created few of the most amazing music pieces in last years. I adore all three of them.

10. Which producers consistently inspire you? And where else does your inspiration come from?

Beside 3 I mentioned I really like The Detroit Escalator Co., Kollektiv Turmstrasse and Apparat. Id love to be romantic saying I get inspiration from sitting on a mountain, in the sunrise, staring into bull’s balls but its not really true. Its just me in the dark room, randomly trying to play something meaningful. But that one time something really happened. I woke up with this melody, did one of my favorite ever tracks and sold it in few hundred copies. And Oakenfold played it. That was the best thing ever, dude.

11. There are countless producers out there trying to find their way and create their own unique sound, what advice do you have for them?

Please don’t do a track I heard 200 times before. Do your own thing. Be creative. Be Henry Saiz or Eric Volta. Be a guy in a basement, an innovator doing his own thing, not the copy cat.

12. If the final DJ/live set of your career was next week what would your last track be?

Nachtamt – Enhacened awareness on Rosedale

Jaska’s remix of FictiOne ‘Path Forward’ is out now on A Must Have, you can purchase the release: here

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  • Mitch Alexander
    Mitch Alexander

    WRITER @ C-U

    Mitch Alexander is the owner of microCastle | Beatport "One of the most influential, tastemaker labels out there and also part of our genre committee."